Brassica carinata


Brassica carinataCommon Name: Ethiopia Mustard
Description
Brassica carinata (Ethiopian rape,Ethiopian mustard, Abyssinian mustard) is a member of the Triangle of U species (U, 1935) in the agriculturally significant Brassica genus. It has 34 chromosomes with genome composition BBCC, and is thought to result from an ancestral hybridisation event between Brassica nigra (genome composition BB) and Brassica oleracea (genome composition CC) (Prakash and Hinata, 1980). Although B. carinata is cultivated as an oilseed crop in Ethiopia (Alemayehu and Becker, 2004), it has generally high levels of undesirable glucosinolates and erucic acid (Getinet et al. 1997), making it a poor choice for general cultivation as an oilseed crop in comparison to the closely related Brassica napus (Rapeseed) . . . .Read more

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Anacardium occidentale


Anacardium occidentaleCommon Name:Cashew
Description
Anacardium occidentale is a medium-sized tree, spreading, evergreen, much branched; grows to a height of 12 m. When grown on lateritic, gravelly, coastal sandy areas, it rarely exceeds 6 m and develops a spreading habit and globose shape with crown diameter to 12 m. Grown inland on loams, it reaches 15 m and is much branched, with a smaller (4-6 m) crown diameter. The root system of a mature A. occidentale, when grown from the seed, consists of a very prominent taproot and a well-developed and extensive network of lateral and sinker roots.
Leaves simple, alternate, coriaceus, glabrous, obovate, rounded at ends, 10-18 x 8-15 cm, with short petiole .…Read more 
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Dacryodes edulis


CoDacryodes edulismmon Name:Safou, African plum
Description
Dacryodes edulis is a medium-sized, evergreen tree attaining a height of 18-40 m in the forest but not exceeding 12 m in plantations. It is generally branched from low down, with a deep, dense crown. The bole is rather short, slightly fluted, 50-170 cm in diameter and more or less sinuous. The scented, pale grey, rough bark exudes a whitish resin. Buttresses are absent.
Leaves compound, imparipinnate, with 5-8 pairs of leaflets; glossy above, pubescent, the pubescence disappearing with age. Read more.
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Solanum nigrum


Solanum nigrumCommon Name: African Nightshade
Description
European black nightshade (Solanum nigrum) or locally just black nightshade, duscle, garden nightshade, garden huckleberry, hound’s berry, petty morel, wonder berry, small-fruited black nightshade, or popolo) is a species in the Solanum genus, native to Eurasia and introduced in the Americas, Australasia, and South Africa. Parts of this plant can be toxic to livestock and humans. Nonetheless, ripe berries and cooked leaves of edible strains are used as food in some locales, and plant parts are used as a traditional medicine. A tendency exists in literature to incorrectly refer to many of the other “black nightshade” species as “Solanum nigrum”.. . . . .Read more

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